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Winter and The Water Element in Chinese Dietary Therapy

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According to the Nei Jing, “Water… keeps on flowing, and simply fills up all the places in which it flows; from any dangerous spot, it does not shrink, not from any plunge, and nothing will make it yield its own natural essence. Under all conditions, it (water) remains true to itself.”

The element of the most Yin of seasons, Winter, is Water. It stands for the accomplishment of a cycle and the purifying of past cycles. Within ourselves as well as in the trunks of trees and roots of plants, energies are gathered deep within. Winter is the time of year to be less physically active and more introspective. During this season, we need to keep warm our internal core for good wellbeing. Indoor activities, reading, and meditation best work in winter.

Winter is the season of the Urinary Bladder/Kidney organ system. The Kidney system is where our root energies reside. Salty and bitter foods are downward/inward moving and contracting, that can help keep us centered and store our energies. Salty foods reinforce the Kidney but too much salt can injure it. Include in your diet soy products, miso, seafood, seaweed, walnuts, millet, sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, barley and celery seeds. Bitter foods include cauliflower, parsnips, rutabagas/turnips, cabbage, alfalfa, celery, quinoa, rye, burdock root and chicory root. Mixed with other roasted herbs, roasted chicory root makes a nice alternative for coffee and with its caffeine content decreases Kidney energies, particularly Essence. You can eat some Yang foods from the Metal Earth sections if you are likely to feel cold during the months of winter. Slow-cooked stews and soups and other forms of one-pot meals are your best choices, and you can include both and salty foods to produce a nutrient-dense healthy meal.

Salty Flavor Foods

Functions: detoxification; cooling; purging of bowels, enhance digestion; dissipate and soften hard masses/lumps; and moisten dryness.

Foods: mushrooms; sunflower seeds; pumpkin seeds; walnuts; celery, barley, black and white sesame seeds; sea vegetables; seaweed (kelp, kombo, etc.); soy products (especially soy sauce and miso); and millet.

Spices/Herbs: nettles, celery seed mineral salts (in their unprocessed natural form).

“Ling’s Acupuncture, Inc.
120 Gatlin Ave
Orlando, FL 32806-6908
(407) 851-2533
http://www.lingsacupuncture.com

Written by Valerie

January 22nd, 2019 at 2:31 pm

Posted in Acupuncture

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