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Chinese Medicine And Its Growing Role In The Health Of Western Society

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While Chinese medicine has been widely used as a healing system for over five millennia, Western medical research continues to ask whether this system can be seen as a rational mode of treatment. Nonetheless, a lot of Western medicine medical experts would fail to discover improbable claims: that qigong maintains health by promoting movement and relaxation, that Chinese herbal formulas may possibly contain potent biochemical agents, and that acupuncture alleviates discomfort by stimulating the manufacture or production of neurotransmitters.

If you’re yet unsure of just how effective Chinese medicine is and are considering trying it, you can view the various studies that have helped others reach their own conclusions about its benefits. Chinese medicine practices are known by many to be very potent, providing occasional relief where Western medicine’s best practices fail, especially for common illnesses such as allergies and flus, and to help eliminate the toxicity of chemically manufactured drugs.

Between the East and West, the most debated topic is the use of acupuncture as medicine. Acupuncture has been shown to be safe based on results gained by medical studies. The studies, at this point, did not result in any conclusions as to whether acupuncture can be deemed a science. Research at the same time shows that in acupuncture, the use of meridians has been successful in treatment. The researchers have also stated that given acupuncture is safe and widely used, it merely requires to have more investigations conducted concerning it. To check for additional areas in which acupuncture therapies can be helpful, additional probing is needed to identify additional areas in which acupuncture treatment can be helpful.

Another topic that’s been discussed by Western researchers is herbal therapies that are used in traditional methods of Chinese medicine. While there are a few of these have not been examined, other parts of the herbs are used in pharmaceutical drugs that are prescribed to patients. Chinese wormwood, Ephedra, and artemisinin are several examples of archaic treatments that have moved from Chinese ideals into Western medicine.

Chinese herbal therapy involves a wide range of compounds that are not used by Western medicine, and there is a keen interest in the use of these compounds aside from the concepts Chinese medicine practitioners use to decide which formula to recommend. It is likely that while herbs were at first chosen on misguided grounds, only compounds that have proven truly effective have stayed in use given the millennium evolution of Chinese medicine. Perhaps, it is possible that while plants and herbs were first and foremost chosen on misguided grounds, only herbs those have shown to be truly effective are the ones that have stayed in use.

In Western medical research, there is a consensus that, within the never-ending ideas of Chinese medicine, is the notion that the treatments are safe. All medical research shows that even if the remedies are not scientifically proven, most of them have few adverse effects and they still are not damaging to one’s wellbeing. This may be a proven fact to the holistic therapies, and many scientists tend to also claim that there is simply a shortage of the medicine used in the philosophies of the Chinese.

Chinese medicine in Pembroke Pines has been a hotly debated topic in Western society from politics to science. However, this can be a starting point to assess the theories that have been experimented with and applied over time. Chinese medicine continues to become an important part of Western society through its various systems due to the continuous use of people who are searching for holistic wellness.

Written by Valerie

November 13th, 2018 at 2:06 pm

The Flavor And Thermal Nature Of Food In Chinese Medicine

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According to Chinese medicine in King of Prussia, a well balanced diet consists of about 20 percent of each of the following five flavors or tastes: salty, spicy, bitter, sour, and sweet. The standard American diet is imbalanced with way too many sweet and salty tastes. Why is this important, you may ask? Well, in Chinese medicine, the health of a person is based on achieving harmony, moderation, and balance in all facets of an individual’s health and well-being. As a society, we often ignore and overlook our choices of food in the maintenance of our health. Chinese medicine combines dietary and food principles to maintain or restore health.

In Chinese medicine, both foods and herbs are classified based on their innate qualities. In choosing a food or herb to address a specific condition, two of the most common standards that are considered are their sensory and thermal qualities. The categorization of foods by temperature in Chinese medicine is assessed in how the way the food is prepared and in the thermal nature of the food itself. This thermal nature of food, which can be cold, cool, hot, warm, or neutral, indicates the influence a specific food has on the body when taken in. This shows how the way we use food as a form of thermal treatment to either cool or warm a certain part of the body in order to reverse a specific condition.

In Chinese medicine, the Five Tastes is one way of categorizing food. The five tastes, in the same way as food temperatures, refer to the type of energy an herb or food during the act of ingestion and in the process of digestion. Each taste has an energetic association and relationship to a specific internal organ. This produces another level of personalization and precision in the choosing of herbs and foods to treat a person with a certain condition.

The job of a Chinese medicine practitioner is to evaluate your symptoms, health, and dietary habits that can help him come up with a proper diagnosis. Dietary prescriptions are often given to support and augment your treatment plan.

Written by Valerie

February 28th, 2018 at 9:57 am

The Basic Ideas of Acupuncture New York

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Acupuncture new york originates from ancient Chinese medicine so basically it is also important to study about Chinese medicine and theories that surrounds this most ancient and useful form of alternative medicine. Chinese medicine sees the body as a small part of the universe which is subject to universal laws and the principals of harmony and balance. It does not draw a sharp line compared to Western medicine. The Chinese system believes that mental and emotional states are every bit as influential on disease as purely as any physical mechanisms. Chinese medicine uses different symbols and ideas to discuss body and health. If Western medicine describes health in terms of measurable physical processes made of chemical reactions, Chinese medicine on the other hand uses ideas like chi, yin and yang, the organ system and the five elements to describe the body and health. Here are some of the basic terms used in Chinese medicine:

  • Yin and Yang, according to Chinese philosophy is the universe and the body that describes two separate complimentary principles that of which is yin and yang. The two principles are always interacting, opposing, and influencing each other and their goal in Chinese medicine is not to eliminate either yin or yang, but to allow the two to balance each other and exist harmoniously together. For example, if a person suffers from symptoms of high blood pressure, the Chinese system would say that the heart organ might have too much yang, and would recommend methods either to reduce the yang or to increase the yin of the heart, depending on the other symptoms and organs in the body. Therefore, acupuncture therapies seek to either increase or reduce yang, or increase or reduce yin in particular regions of the body.
  • Chi is another fundamental concept of Chinese medicine which is the fundamental life energy of the universe. It is invisible and is found in the environment in the air, water, food and sunlight and in the body it is the invisible vital force that creates and animates life. Every individual is born with inherited amounts of chi, and we also get acquired chi from the food we eat and the air we breathe. The level and quality of a person’s chi also depends on the state of physical, mental and emotional balance. Chi moves through the body along channels called meridians.
  • The Organ System in the Chinese system is compose of twelve main organs which is the lung, large intestine, stomach, spleen, heart, small intestine, urinary bladder, kidney, liver, gallbladder, pericardium, and the “triple warmer”. The latter represents the entire torso region. Each organ has chi energy associated with it, and each organ interacts with particular emotions on the mental level. With twelve organs, there are twelve types of chi which can move through the body, and these move through twelve main channels or meridians. Chinese doctors attach symptoms to organs. Symptoms are caused by yin/yang imbalances in one or more organs so an unhealthy flow of chi to or from one organ to another. Each organ has a different outline of symptoms it can manifest.

Written by Valerie

July 16th, 2010 at 9:12 am