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Chinese Nutritional Therapy And TCM

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The acknowledgement of individuality is one of the things most liked about traditional Chinese medicine or TCM. This also stretches to the realm of Chinese nutritional therapy. Here, in Chinese nutritional therapy, there is no “one size fits all” or diets or herbal regimens. Each is customized to the needs of the person, and it’s known that each individual needs can vary widely.

A balanced diet, from the perspective of the Chinese, is quite different from that in the West. A balanced diet for the Chinese is one that integrates the five 5 tastes – salty, sweet, bitter, sour, and spicy. Herbs and foods that have a specific taste or flavor are likely to possess specific properties. For instance, bitter foods and herbs tend to be Cold and drying making them ideal for addressing Damp Heat problems, but not recommended for individuals who are too Dry and/or too Cold. Most bitter foods and herbs have antibiotic-like qualities while Salty foods and herbs are more inclined to moisten and warm. They therefore can be used to treat people suffering from Dryness and Cold, but are contraindicated for people who are Damp and Hot.

There is also such a thing as a bland flavor that goes with the five basic flavors. Bland foods and herbs tend to possess qualities that help drain Dampness. Some experts make a distinction between astringent and sour, clumping both these flavors under sour. Foods and herbs that have a sour taste tend to be moistening and possess heating energy. Astringent foods and herbs tend to be drying and cooling.

There are certain herbs and foods that possess more than one taste. The Wu Wei Shi herb, for example, is highly valued because it possesses all the five tastes. Actually, its name literally translates to Five Flavor Seed. (The scientific name for Wu Wei Shi is schizandra or Fructus Schizandrae.)

A balanced diet, according to the Chinese, is one that contains all the five tastes. However, the proportionality of those flavors/tastes tends to differ based on the season of the year and the needs of the person. A person suffering from Yang deficiency requires a higher ratio of foods that have Yang energy compared to other individuals. These Yang energy foods can furnish Yang energy to a yang deficient individual and aids him or her in obtaining balance. A person who has a Yin Deficiency problem will, on the other hand, require a larger ratio of Yin energy foods. Someone suffering from Dampness is required to go easy on herbs and foods that have sour, salty, and/or sweet flavors as they tend to be moistening. If you have problems with Dampness, it’s not necessary to consume a huge amount of herbs and foods that have moistening properties that tend to exacerbate the Dampness. These flavors and foods are recommended for some individuals who have problems related to Dryness. (There are exclusions). Each diet is thoroughly customized for the person. It’s also important to remember if the person is too Cold or too Hot. Despite the fact that all three flavors have a tendency to moisten, sweet is likely to be cooling while sour and salty tend to be heating. Sour has a more heating property than salty; therefore, one needs to avoid sour in instances of Damp Heat.

Foods that have bitter, spicy, and astringent properties can be excellent for individuals suffering from excessive Dampness but only good for people with excessive Dryness. One should also consider the thermal energy of food. Foods with cooling properties include astringent herbs and foods. Bitter herbs tend to be even more cooling than the astringent herbs and foods that tend to be too much heating.

This article shows show how a significant part of TCM involves the balancing of opposites. To balance deficient Yang, one needs to eat foods replete with Yang energy. Since winter is the most Yin time of the seasons, eating foods rich in Yang foods is appropriate. During summer, the most Yang time of the season, eating Yin rich foods is then recommended. Sometimes, however, it’s a good idea to be in harmony with the season. Therefore, during winter, eat Yin foods and during summer, eat Yang foods. Traditional Chinese medicine is custom made based on the needs of the person.

Generally speaking, meats are Yang and vegetables, Yin. Also, the manner in which food is prepared substantially influences the quantity of Yang or Yin energy of the food. Yang tends to increase when food is fried, and yin tends to increase when food is steamed. Therefore, veggies that are stir-fried have more Yang energy in them than veggies that were steamed. If you suffer from Yang Deficiency, it is a good idea to stir-fry your vegetables. On the other hand, if you are deficient in Yin energy, it’s a good idea to less of stir-fried veggies and lots of steamed veggies. Food served warm and cooked tends to be more warming compared to cold and raw food. Celery cooked in a stir-fried dish served warm, for instance, has greater warming quality and possesses more Yang energy than raw celery served in a cold salad.

Some flavors also have a certain association with some of the Organ systems in the body. The salty taste, for instance, has a close relationship with the bladder and Kidneys. Some foods are sometimes salted to help derive the qualities of the food to the Kidneys. It’s widely believed that a person suffering from Kidney imbalances can feel better after just eating a little salt and drinking herbal teas that have tonifying properties to the Kidneys. In general, the sour flavor has a close association with the Gall Bladder and Liver. (You should be careful as this may lead to Damp Heat affecting the Liver or gall stones). Bitter has a relationship with the Small Intestine and Heart, sweet, for the Stomach and Spleen and spicy for the Large Intestine and Lungs.

In Chinese nutritional therapy, there is absolutely no such thing as “one size fits all” or forbidden foods. From time to time, sugar may be even added in an herbal remedy because it is needed by the person. (In America, this rarely happens, but in other countries, sugar is deemed as medicine for some people. But the use of sugar in the US is so overdone that it is classified as a “poison”).

There are no “one size fits all” diet therapies even in the West. People have this erroneous belief that we’re all the same – like transposable components on a factory line. Salt, for instance, is deemed harmful for a lot of people and can increase blood pressure in many of them. Most of these people are strictly on a low sodium diet. However, a low sodium diet can create havoc to people suffering from NMH or Neurally Mediated Hypotension or adrenal insufficiency. Most of us require lots of water to rehydrate ourselves or to survive; for others, however such as people suffering from epilepsy, drinking too much water can be dangerous. There are people who need to lots of fat in their diet more than others. This is especially true with children in particular, who may develop growth and health problems when impetuous parents restrict the eating of too much fat in their child’s diets. Because of an assault to our systems or as a result of genetics, some of us have more than an average need for taking certain minerals or vitamins. A deficiency of iodine in our body can result in goiter, but excessive amounts of iodine can bring about instances of hyperthyroidism. You can basically exacerbate an existing illness if you consume the wrong foods at the wrong time.

Certain preventive measures are required when selecting these foods as they tend to be eaten on a regular basis over the long term which can have a long lasting and profound effect on the functions of the body. If a specific herbal remedy is used over a long period of time, the same precautions apply. This means there’s prudence in following a diverse diet not only based on the Western perspective of range of nutrients and/or allergies, but also from the perspective of traditional Chinese medicine).

Salty food should be avoided in deficient blood as they tend to dry the Blood.

Pungent foods disperse Chi and in deficient Chi syndrome should be avoided.

Sweet foods settle on the muscles and too much of it can lead to muscle weakness.

Bitter foods settle on the bones and to avoid diseases of the bone, too much of it should be avoided.

Sour foods settle on the nerves and can disturb the Liver, therefore, if a person suffers from chronic pain, it should be sparingly used.

Salty foods settle on the Kidneys, if you suffer from a diseased Liver, you need to avoid pungent foods, salty foods go to the Kidneys, pungent foods go to the Lungs, sweet foods goes to the Spleen, bitter foods go to the Heart, and sour foods go to the Liver. According to Chinese nutritional therapy, do not eat pungent foods if the Liver is diseased, you should not eat bitter foods if the Lung is diseased, if you have a diseased Kidney, you should not eat sweet foods, you should not eat sour foods if your Kidney is diseased, if you have diseased Heart, refrain from eating pungent foods.

In instances of Liver disease, you may be wondering about limiting or avoiding the consumption of spicy foods, limiting salty foods in cases of Heart disease when salt flavor has an affiliation with the Kidneys, limiting sour foods for Spleen disorders, when the Liver is affiliated with the sour taste.

These constraints all deal with the five elements theory of the Victor-Vanquished rule. This rule essentially deals with the Organ systems that have opposite affiliations with each other. In a Victor-Vanquished relationship, one gets weakened while the other gets stronger. For instance, if there is excessive amount of energy in the Liver, it can invade the Spleen. This disharmony is known as Liver attacking the Spleen (this means a very strong Liver causes it to attack the Spleen, which is very weak). In this instance, the attack of the Spleen by the Liver causes damage that can be painful and can wreak havoc to the digestion. If sour foods (which are affiliated with the Liver) are eaten by someone with a weak Spleen, it’s weakening the Spleen and energizing the Liver even more because of the inverse effect of the Victor-Vanquished relationship between the Spleen and the Liver. There are occasions in which the Element that usually is the Vanquished will reverse the tables on the Element that’s typically known as the Victor. This is known as “Insulting”. In this instance Spleen (Earth) Insulting Liver (Wood).

It’s important to remember that the first line of defense in health matters is Chinese nutritional therapy in . Occasionally, before the medicinal herbs are given or before the herbs can work properly, the individual will need to straighten out his/her diet.

Christina Prieto is an Orlando acupuncturist, a certified Yoga instructor and the founder of Harmony Wellness center in central Florida.

Written by Valerie

October 30th, 2018 at 5:52 am

Tai Chi Promotes Both Physical And Mental Well-Being

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An extremely old type of martial arts, Tai Chi centers on the internal energy of the body known in Chinese as “chi”. Tai Chi is designed to promote both physical and mental well-being by integrating the spirit, body, and mind and increase the flow of chi.

Tai Chi is more than just a string of motions it also entails the use of deep breathing and meditation, which are especially useful for lowering anxiety and stress. People who practice Tai Chi on a daily or regular basis have experienced an improved sense of well being due to the practice’s meditative and calming features. Because of the characteristics of the motions/movements, Tai Chi also benefits the whole body by improving flexibility and balance and increasing the strength of the muscles. Several doctors advise their patients to take up Tai Chi as an adjunctive form of therapy especially the one’s suffering from high blood pressure, circulatory problems, arthritis, and severe stress.

It’s much better to learn Tai Chi from an experienced practitioner or instructor rather from a book. If there is no instructor or practitioner teaching Tai Chi near you, then the next best thing is learning how to practice from a Tai Chi video. However, videos and books are best used as auxiliary sources of information to add what you have learned in a Tai Chi class.

Tai Chi requires that you keep your breath, mind, and body together whilst moving in an effortless, rhythmical, and continuous flow. You’ll learn how to relax the body and mind with regular practice, totally clearing out any feelings of tension and stress you have in your mind and body.

Orlando Holistic Acupuncture, LLC
2221 Lee Rd #16
Winter Park, FL 32789
(407) 683-3995
https://www.bestorlandoacu.com

Written by Valerie

September 25th, 2018 at 2:17 pm

Posted in Acupuncture

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Different Forms Of Asian Bodywork Therapy

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Most people are unaware of the benefits that a practitioner of Oriental Medicine in Jacksonville or Asian bodywork can offer. If you’re unsure of the different styles of Asian bodywork or are unsure of where to begin, you have not yet tried this type of therapy.

When talking about Asian bodywork, one of the first things that come to mind is that Asian people are the only one’s offering these techniques. Asian bodywork is actually practiced and performed by every ethnicity these days. Those healers have gone through rigorous training and certification and are practicing these techniques in several rural areas, suburbs, and even in homes. Simply ask for your therapist’s credentials if you’re not sure about them. Elite practitioners and therapists of Asian bodywork have certification provided by the AOBTA or the American Organization for Bodywork Therapies of Asia.

Asian style therapists utilize several different modalities including Swedish massage and other traditional techniques. In their massage, several Western approaches do not avail of the use of ‘energy’ primarily because it can be difficult to think about it since they actually cannot be seen. However, most of us are familiar about the central nervous system. In Asian style bodywork, the therapist is performing the massage in such a way that restores balance to the person making him not too drowsy after a massage session, even in Swedish massage.

Asian bodywork therapists also use various unique modalities. According to ancient documents, the Chinese have been using massage for thousands of years ago, before anyone else. This implies that ALL forms of massages originated in China in one way or another. Tui Na is the number one type of massage practiced in China today. It is a medical version of massage with less ‘fluff’ and more therapeutic value and is also used to provide orthopedic massage, and physical therapy and for treatment of sports injuries and ailments. It uses a unique set of hand techniques that’s way beyond strokes and entails very little disrobing and little-to-no oils. Tui Na uses deep tissue techniques, sports therapies, traction, stretching, and acupressure.

Acupressure is basically massaging the acupoints of the body. It is very similar to Shiatsu, but traditionally is performed on the floor.

Reflexology utilizes various parts of the body including the ear, hand, and foot to address those ‘reflex zones’ that will lead to the treatment of the entire body. Foot reflexology is the most popular type of reflexology. Most foot reflexology treatments are done by a skilled therapist who took a single class on the subject and performs a simple foot rub on the client. Real foot reflexology does not use foot baths, crèmes, or lotions. Instead it uses very special finger and thumb techniques to work the foot in a very specific way and direction. Talk to your therapist if you plan to get a real foot reflexology therapy.

I urge you to look for an Asian bodywork therapist in your area and ask for a consultation or try one of their special treatments. Other healing therapies include Shiatsu, Thai Massage, Lomi Lomi, and more.

Written by Valerie

September 25th, 2018 at 2:14 pm

Integrating Western Medicine And Eastern Medicine Is The Best Approach To Healing

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TCM or Traditional Chinese Medicine in Vancouver, which includes herbology, Chinese physical therapy (Tui Na), and acupuncture have been practiced for thousands of years to help heal the human body. Unfortunately, it tends to be sidelined because it is not commercialized and most people are unfamiliar to it. This article will strive to let you know more a little about this ancient healing system.

Origins

The aforementioned components of TCM do not heal the body per se but instead aids in healing. We say this because these components set off the self-healing processes of the body. The remedies found in herbology, acupuncture, and Tui na balance the body which promotes healing. They do not address the symptoms of a disease. They actually treat its underlying cause.

In TCM, there exists and energy within the human body called Chi or Qi. But the theory of a universal flow of energy is really not novel. Physicists in the West have come to the conclusion that all matter is energy and all energy is matter. Chi circulates inside the body, and the body is in balance when Chi flows smoothly. We become ill when the Chi slows down or speeds up due to a blockage or other factors that tend to affect its flow. Think of it this way…

Chi can be thought of as a free-flowing river, the current keeps the water clean and well-oxygenated while the rocks help filter the water. Imagine now that a tree branch or trunk has fallen into the river and creates an obstruction like a partial dam. Water builds up in an area, and the flow begins to slow down. The stagnating waters cause algae to grow in the water and on the rocks. Detritus and debris get snared in the dammed up part of the river resulting in bacterial growth that eventually flows downriver.

External

The underlying cause of your pain can be sometimes a chronic physical condition or an injury. Tui Na herbology, and acupuncture are as equally effective in resolving orthopedic trauma as Western medicine. Many kung fu practitioners and athletes swear by these healing modalities.

Injuries can be due to stagnation and blockages, especially with regards to circulation. We could use an herbal ointment to heal a sprained ankle. The ointment contains herbs that have their own unique healing properties. It may contain for instance, turmeric that can help treat inflammation and boost circulation. Less inflammation means less pain. Thus, turmeric can be often found many ointments to relieve pain.

Tui Na practically is therapeutic massage. This type of treatment also helps restore balance in the body by encouraging the flow of chi through the energy channels or meridians (where chi flows), muscles, and joints.

Internal

Being examined by a practitioner of TCM is different from the kind of examination one gets from a Western medicine doctor. In TCM examination, unless you’re referring about your pulse (which mirrors circulation), there are no blood tests. Your pulse, symptoms, and appearance (the physical appearance of your skin, tongue, etc.) are the things observed by a practitioner.

Both herbology and acupuncture are used to address stagnation and chi blockages that can be the underlying reason for any number of pain or ailments, and can be used together to resolve one or multiple health issues. Acupuncture needles are inserted into the point(s) of obstruction while the herbs are given to encourage the movement of chi and circulation.

Herbs can come in the form of ointment, tea, or pills, and if your TCM practitioner is also an herbalist, he exactly knows how to combine them. There is no Tylenol in a Chinese pharmacy. It only sells herbs – lots of them. Actually the first pharmaceutical drugs used in Western medicine were herbs. Sadly however, especially with regard to “Big Pharma,” it’s apparent that Western medicine seems to be too much concerned with treating symptoms alone and providing people with a temporary fix for their illness.

The Best of Both Worlds

Healing can be maximized by integrating Western medicine and Eastern medicine. Both aspects of these two healing systems should be incorporated to attain balance in our practice. In various instances, a lifetime on medication is not the answer, nor surgery. Combining TCM with the best practices Western science and medicine has to offer (including nutritional therapy) gives you the tools necessary to attain wellness and health.

Written by Valerie

September 25th, 2018 at 1:48 pm

Gua Sha Can Be Used As Treatment For A Myriad Of Illnesses And Ailments

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One traditional Chinese medicine technique in Austin that uses pressured strokes on oiled skin with various instruments such as jade stone, water buffalo horn, or a coin is Gua Sha therapy. It is a natural safe form of treatment and has a myriad benefits to health. It is rapidly becoming popular in the US and Europe.

In Chinese medicine, Gua Sha means to literally scrape away illness. It is a type of folk medicine that has been practiced in Southeast and Northeast Asia for thousands of years.

As a traditional Chinese therapy, Gua Sha demonstrates its therapeutic effects in the following ways:

1. Helps eliminate toxins in the blood
2. Activate the collaterals and relaxes tendons and muscles
3. Strengthens the immunity of the individual
4. Removes blood stasis and enhances the flow of blood

After a session of Gua Sha, the back of the patient has several extravasation of blood from the peripheral capillaries that result in subdermal blemishing which usually takes two to four days to disappear. Since Gua Sha is known to be safe and cause zero side effects, it can be used in a person’s daily life. It can be used by almost any individual as treatment for a myriad of illnesses and ailments. However, it is contraindicated people with the following conditions and diseases:

1. People who are tired, full, or very hungry.
2. Women who are pregnant should not have gua sha therapy on their belly.
3. People with swelling in their body.
4. People suffering from hypohepatia, renal insufficiency, or severe cardiovascular diseases.
5. People with mental disorders.
6. People suffering from trauma, fracture, or acute lumbar sprain.
7. People with bleeding disorders.
8. People suffering from advanced leukemia, anemia, or diabetes.
9. People suffering from infectious diseases.

People suffering from one of the above diseases or from one of the above conditions should get permission from their doctors in order to avoid unnecessary problems.

Written by Valerie

April 17th, 2018 at 4:55 am

Posted in Traditional Chinese Medicine

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The Various Benefits Of Gua Sha Therapy

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The benefits of gua sha therapy are numerous and it especially works against any chronic disorder that involves inflammation or pain.

Gua sha promotes smooth flow of blood to the organs, connective tissues, and muscles; enhances range of movement; and relieves pain and spasms. One session of this therapy often heads off an oncoming cold and can be an effective way to quiet a persistent cough. Studies have revealed that gua sha results in a four-fold boost in microcirculation, stimulates the immune system, and treats inflammation. It also increases the activity of an enzyme that helps lessen inflammation of the internal organ: the heme-oxygenase-1. The upregulation of HO-1 explains in part the use of gua sha for internal organ conditions such as liver disease cough, hepatitis and asthma.

Does gua sha leave bruises or abrasions in the body?

While the site of treatment in gua sha will look like road rash after the therapy, surface of the skin is totally intact and there is no bleeding related to this technique. Gua sha will leave skin discoloration that looks like a bruise but is not. Bruising happens when a sheer force or blow damages the capillaries and leads to bleeding in the tissue. In gua sha, however, blood cells are pressed or extravasated via the capillary walls without the surrounding tissues and the capillaries being damaged. The site of treatment will usually feel a bit tender after treatment but all in all, the result is rapid alleviation of pain and an increase in range of movement.

What happens during and after the therapy?

During the procedure, the therapist utilizes a smooth-edged instrument to stroke the skin repeatedly. Gua means “press stroke” or “to rub” while Sha is a word that denotes the congestion of blood in the surface tissue in parts of the body where the patient experiences pain and stiffness; sha can also refer to the tiny red spots that are elevated during the procedure. “Petechiae” is the medical term for the red spots that occurs during the therapy.

Those petechiae are the blood cells that have been pressed outside of the tiny blood vessels (capillaries) as the therapist strokes the skin time and time again. The process of re-absorption within the body immediately starts and it is the this process, combined with a significant rise in local circulation, that leads to the pain-relieving, immune-boosting, and anti-inflammatory benefits that gua sha provides.

Why is the color of sha important and how quick does it fade?

The associated petechiae from gua sha range in color from bright to dark red, and from blue to almost black. When the therapy is performed at the site of an acute or relatively new problem, the color of the petechiae usually is bright red. The reason for this is that the blood stuck beneath the skin in the connective tissue arises during only the procedure. In contrast, the ensuing petechiae when the therapy is done on the treatment site that experiences chronic injury or pain are usually bluish or even black in color. This is due to the blood that has been stagnant for a considerable amount of time.

Also important is how rapid the petechiae dissipate following the procedure. Among young healthy individuals with strong circulatory systems, petechiae vanish quite rapidly. If the gua sha is performed on children in the morning, the petechiae usually vanish by the end of the day. On the other hand, among older people suffering from chronic pain or with slow or weak circulation, the petechiae may need almost a week to completely vanish.

Individuals with stagnant circulation may find that their skin takes longer than usual to return to its normal appearance.

It’s important to remember the following instructions days after your gua sha treatment:

1. For three days following treatment, drink lots of water.

2. As the site of treatment becomes more flexible and dramatically less painful, be informed that if the site is overburdened by strenuous activity days following treatment, it will be prone to re-injury.

3. Wear a scarf over the treated site during windy or cool weather. Use a shirt to cover the treated site at night.

4. Avoid exposing the treated site to extreme temperature, direct sunlight, or drafts till the appearance of your skin goes back to normal.

Dr. Guoen Wang is a licensed acupuncturist, herbalist and doctor of Chinese medicine in Austin Texas.

Written by Valerie

April 17th, 2018 at 4:53 am

Gua Sha Treats A Wide Range Of Health Issues Including Chronic And Acute Pain

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An ancient form of East Asian healing technique, Gua Sha is used to treat a wide range of health issues including chronic and acute pain. This technique uses a smooth instrument to scrape the skin in order to generate a therapeutic and temporary rash. The rash that develops is believed to relieve pain and other issues associated with stagnation of blood flow or “congestion” of blood.

According to Gua Sha healers, chronic and acute inflammation and pain are due to sluggish movement of vital energy or Chi and blood of a patient. They believe that when the skin in the affected area of the body is scraped, the area develops an elevated rash that treats pain and other symptoms of illnesses by forcing stagnant fluids and blood to move. When the fluids and blood start to move, they transport metabolic waste towards muscles and surface tissues, and boost microcirculation in the site of treatment.

The rashes from the Gua Sha therapy consist of tiny blood extravasations just deep to the skin surface (Sha). In Western medicine, these tiny blood leakages are called “ecchymoses” or “petechiae” and are an apparent sign that static blood has been restored to a healthy flow. The rashes normally clear around two to four days.

Some of the health problems that can be treated with Gua Sha therapy include musculoskeletal problems such as spasm, strain, and fibromyalgia and respiratory conditions such as emphysema, bronchitis, asthma, and the common cold. In the management of pain, Gua Sha is known to alleviate chronic and acute pain that may be attributed to these and other conditions.

Procedure

During a session of Gua Sha therapy, the practitioner or healer presses or palpates the skin of the patient in order to locate tender knots and points in the substratal musculature. The healer also searches for parts of the body that display delayed capillary refill or blanching. Then based on the findings, the healer lubricates the site of treatment with oil and then using a smooth instrument scrapes the treatment site with broad strokes until the telltale rash develops. Some of the instruments typically used to create the rash include slices of animal horn, coins, or soup spoons; and the treatment sites usually treated are the stomach, chest, limbs, buttocks, shoulders, neck, and back.

The duration and color of the rash is believed to aid the Gua sha healer to diagnose and customize a plan of treatment to specifically address the needs of the patient. For instance, a light-colored Sha can indicate a Chinese medicine diagnosis known as “blood deficiency,” while dark-colored Sha may indicate stagnant blood that has been going on for an extended period of time.

Gua Sha Benefits

A growing body of research provides clinical evidence that acupuncture, cupping, gua sha, massage, and other reflex therapies aid in reducing the symptoms of pain by influencing the function of the spinal cord and pain-sensing neurons called nociceptors. In addition, these comforting social therapies may be good for patients suffering from pain by promoting relaxation.

A controlled clinical randomized open trial revealed that Gua Sha generated positive short-term effects on functional status and pain in patients suffering from chronic pain in the neck. The trial recruited 48 patients who were randomly treated with local thermal heat pads or with Gua Sha therapy. The effects of the treatment were monitored for seven days. Compared to the control group, the group given gua sha therapy experienced significant improvement in the severity of their neck pain. The patients in the gua sha group also experienced reduced scores on the NDI (Neck Disability Index (NDI), relief of pain, and a higher quality of life. The researchers reported that the Gua Sha treatment was apparently well tolerated and totally safe.

In another similar controlled randomized study, the effects of gua sha therapy on the pressure pain thresholds and pain ratings in patients suffering from chronic low back pain and chronic neck pain was measured. It was discovered that the patients treated with Gua Sha therapy reported decreases in these two pain scales.

Risks

Neither the current national standards nor the literature adequately address Gua Sha therapy safety standards. It is widely believed, however, that Gua Sha should not be performed on patients suffering from bleeding disorders or taking blood thinners. Gua Sha should also not be performed in parts of the body where there are open sores burns and other superficial skin lesions, in areas where there is bruising, and in areas such as the spine where there are overlying bony prominences. It should also not be performed on the genitalia.

Results

The response of the patient to Gua Sha therapy guides the healer into creating a customized plan of treatment. The duration and color of the rash, for instance, can provide information that can be used in planning future treatment.

Moreover, the personal experience of the patient may determine whether Gua Sha is a proper treatment for their pain. Those likely to benefit from additional sessions are patients who report relaxation and pain relief.

Blue Mountain Acupuncture
2200 Melrose St Suite 9
Walla Walla, WA 99362
Phone: (509) 876-4597
https://www.bluemountainacupuncture.com

Written by Valerie

April 10th, 2018 at 4:50 am

The Chinese Five Elements System And The Meridian System In The Body

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The meridian system uses the Chinese Five Elements system as its infrastructure. This Five Elements model, developed in Asia for over thousands of years, is what Traditional Chinese Medicine, acupressure, acupuncture, and several other modes of treatment are based on.

These Asian modes of treatment, refined in a culture that sees the body as a self balancing system that in case of an imbalance, necessitates action to help the body rebalance itself. Rather than the Western concepts of disease or pathology, it’s all about pattern.

You can use an acupuncture diagram to know where the meridians are located in the body. However, these meridians are not really visible in the body. You wouldn’t be able to find tiny tubes through which chi or vital energy moves, unlike veins through which blood flows. However, research done suggests a quantifiable change in electric charge on specific points on the body which conform to the points that have been mapped on acupuncture diagrams. Research has also determined skin surface conductivity which suggests a conductivity change around the mapped acupuncture points. Unfortunately, Western science does not follow the energy model concept of a system or the body which considers the spirit/ mind/body as a whole instead of the affected part of the body affected and so is inclined to discard it as fantasy.

Meridians are the channels of energy that radiate around and throughout the body, which the Ancient Asians noticed, utilized and continue to use up to the present.

Vita-Health Acupuncture and Wellness Center
12301 Taft St #200
Pembroke Pines, FL 33026
Phone: (954) 880-0090
http://www.vitahealthmedspa.com

Written by Valerie

April 10th, 2018 at 4:42 am

Treatment Of Respiratory Conditions Using Gua Sha Therapy

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One of Chinese medicine’s ancient home remedy for respiratory conditions and other ailments is gua sha therapy. This technique is known as scraping and is starting to find more and more adherents in the West.

As with a lot of alternative therapies, the West has not subjected this therapy to comprehensive scientific studies. The Pain Medicine journal, a few years ago, published the findings of a small study, which showed that when compared to a thermal heating pad, the use of gua sha led to positive short-term results in the treatment of chronic neck pain.

Physical therapists use it to treat foot conditions such as back pain, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis and other muscle problems in the leg. The therapy in general isn’t actually pleasant for the patient and can be a bit uncomfortable.

To locate part of the body that feel tight, gua sha therapists, like massage therapists, palpate their patients and when they find areas that require treatment, the therapists rub them with a spoon or another scraping tool until they area turns red. Basically, the therapist is scraping the blockages in their skin.

For tight muscles, obviously, the area to scarpe is where those muscles are located. Scraping for other ailments, however, is determined by traditions that target the various organs associated with certain parts of the body. The patient’s back, after the first treatment, appears as though he had fallen off a high diving board backward down to a pool. The skin looks completely red with welts and scrapes showing, particularly in areas where the patient had complained of tingling that he thought was because of poor circulation and muscle stiffness.

The redness fades after a few days.

In Germany, researchers at the teaching hospital of the University of Duisburg-Essen formulated a randomized clinical trial that some showed patients with chronic mechanical neck pain being given gua sha therapy while a control group was administered with heating pads to the neck.

The researchers concluded that “compared to the control group the severity of the neck pain of the gua sha group significantly improved after one week compared to the control group. Major therapeutic effects were also discovered for pain at motion and the quality of life of the treatment group significantly improved.

They also noted that “in the long-term management of neck pain and other issues, the efficacy of gua sha needs to be clarified.”

Vancouver Acupuncturists believe that gua sha therapy is a potential treatment for mastitis and neck pain although mastitis (engorgement of the breast) affects people especially some breast-feeding mothers. The therapy also elevates temporary therapeutic petechiae or other few hemorrhages from broken blood vessels. It stimulates the body to produce an immune and anti-inflammatory response.

Gua sha is safe and is a surprisingly painless treatment. It triggers the immune response of the body that in turn, can lead to the treatment of infection or can make the antibiotic more effective.

While gua sha therapy is often taught at Chinese medicine schools, no one needs a certification or license to practice the therapy. The way gua sha is done is simple but unscientific. When a person gets sick, the sickness inside his body can’t get out. The strokes of Gua sha therapy allow the sickness to escape.

Written by Valerie

April 3rd, 2018 at 6:37 am

The Human Meridian System With Its Collaterals And Meridians

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Based on the perspective of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), a human being is a small representation of the universe. Through the ceaseless observations of a whole human being and by compiling the findings of these observations, the existence of the human meridian system with its collaterals and channels has been established. The human meridian system is nothing less than an invisible system of interconnected and definite pathways through which energy or qi is moved and transported throughout the body. This system surely cannot be determined by dissecting a cadaver, because the object of study is merely a body of flesh without life. For thousands of years, the concept of the human meridian system has been shown to be accurate in the annals of medical practice. The system of traditional Chinese medical massage, moxibustion, acupuncture, as well as deep-breathing exercises, among others were all designed based on the concept of the human meridian system.

Thousands of years ago, scholars of TCM saw that close relationships between time and man and the seasons and man did indeed exist.

Does anyone know why early in the morning most healthy people rush to the lavatory to pass stool? According to traditional Chinese medicine, the human body has a dozen energy meridians or channels in the meridian system and that each of these meridians has its essential time of the day for passing stool. Around five to seven A.M. is the time in which the movement of the qi or life energy of the body goes into the meridian of the large intestine. This is usually the time most people feel a need to defecate. In a related matter, why do some individuals talk about the need to “adjust the time difference”? The reason for this is the flow of qi through each meridian is tied to the time of the day. An individual feels an instinctive urge to make some adjustment of their daily habits when they arrive at a new place. This is needed for their body to adapt to the changes to the primary time in the movement of qi through each of the meridians.

How are practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine able to evaluate the internal health condition of a patient by merely drawing inference from the patient’s external characteristics?

Let’s take as an example the simple case of evaluating the internal condition of an apple when buying from among a throng of watermelons at a market stall. A stall owner in China often offers gratuitous service to his customers and so he may have selected a good choice for you. Someone who has worked in raising or selling apples all his life knows how to make the best choice by simply banking on his experience. In the same manner, a healing practitioner can visually evaluate the internal condition of a patient by trusting on his personal experience, as well as utilizing his grasp of traditional Chinese medicine, which is fundamental. This is because traditional Chinese medicine is a natural science with an extensive history of development through constant practice and observation.

Ling’s Acupuncture, Inc.
120 Gatlin Ave
Orlando, FL 32806-6908
(407) 851-2533
http://www.lingsacupuncture.com

Written by Valerie

April 3rd, 2018 at 4:40 am