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Archive for August, 2017

The Advantages In Attaining A Certification To Practice Acupressure

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Recently in Taichung, Taiwan, the China Medical University School of Nursing did a double-blind clinical trial on premature infants who were given meridian acupressure massage over a course of 10 days, 15 minutes each day, three times a day. During the procedures, which were administered before the feedings, the premature babies in the study group were given abdominal meridian massage, had their stomachs rubbed, and received other acupressure kneading procedures.

Researchers observed that both the control group (who were given standard care) and study group showed some significant improvements. At the first week of the trial, no marked difference between the two groups was observed; the week after, the weight of the infants in the study group was significantly higher than the control group. These outcomes are promising and seem to indicate that acupressure in Austin can be a beneficial mode of treatment that neonatal nurses can perform even in premature infants to stimulate growth and boost health.

What is acupressure?

Like acupuncture, acupressure originated from the ancient form of Chinese medicine. As a natural and noninvasive health care treatment, acupressure has been known to eliminate blockages from Chi (life energy/force). This promotes self-healing abilities and restores balance to the body.

Acupressure is a type of massage therapy and is also an energy medicine that does not cause pain. Furthermore, needles are not needed in this firm but gentle touch therapy.

FAQs about Acupressure

Besides aiding in the promotion of wellness and health among premature infants, acupressure is often used to help alleviate pain, boost blood flow, enhance the function of the immune system, lower stress, and bring back balance in the bodies of children as well as adults.

Some of the common health problems that acupressure can be useful in treating include arthritis, lumbar pain, fibromyalgia, and nausea (especially in patients with cancer), among many others.

Can Anyone Do Acupressure?

Although community courses are offered for learning basic acupressure procedures to heal oneself, there are a lot of colleges of Oriental Medicine and schools of massage therapy that provide certification programs for acupressure. Regardless if what’s offered is an individual training program or an advanced study in acupressure, the training basically involves the application and background of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) philosophies and of course, the acupressure treatment itself. Also included in the studies are pathology, physiology, anatomy, meridian treatment, and the theory of the Five Elements.

Acupressure certification on the national level is contingent upon the student passing of the Asian Bodywork Therapy (ABT) exam, which is provided by the NCCAOM (National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine). To ensure that your training meets all educational and State training requirements (National certification level) it is important that you first carefully examine your prospective course of study before enrolling in it.

The demand for massage therapy is growing by the day. This type of holistic treatment is vital to both allopathic medicine and holistic therapy practitioners. In the aforementioned clinical trial, nurses who have received training in acupressure therapy for infants are at an advantage in getting work in neonatal units. Veterinary technicians, veterinarians and other conventional medicine practitioners are integrating acupressure into their practice and get training to better handle the needs of their canine equine patients. Acupressure certification attained by massage therapists make these therapists better equipped to provide clients with more in-depth bodywork therapies; and thus by adding these educational credentials to their resume, they can earn a substantially higher income.

Written by Valerie

August 1st, 2017 at 7:59 am

Posted in Acupuncture

The Importance Of Nutritional Therapy In Chinese Medicine

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One of the foundations of Chinese medicine is Nutritional or Dietary therapy. Chinese medicine has been focusing on foods that have been curing illnesses for thousands of years.

With regard to nutritional therapy, Western medicine and Chinese medicine have at least one major difference. In Western medicine, nutritional therapy is seldom used to treat symptoms but it’s widely used for treating obesity and excess weight problems; in Chinese medicine, it is used to cure lots of diseases.

Another difference is that Chinese medicine not only takes into account the energies, flavors, and the movements of foods as it relates to various body organs but also the nutritional content of foods such as minerals, vitamins, proteins, and carbohydrates.

There are five food flavors in Chinese medicine: sweet, sour, salty, pungent, and bitter. These flavors have an impact on the internal organs and not just give you the taste.

1. Sweet tasting foods can include watermelon, chestnut, beef, banana, and, of course, sugar. They all can affect your spleen and stomach. They can help address toxicity from other foods and slow down acute symptoms. Sweet foods, in Western medicine, tend to increase your weight due to the fact that they are loaded with “empty calories.” Practitioners of Chinese medicine believe that sweet foods can negatively affect your spleen and stomach and impair your digestive functions, which cause you to eat more and thus, increase your weight.

2. Sour tasting foods like plum, pear, lemon, and mango can impact your gallbladder and liver and block movements. They are ideal for controlling excessive sweating and for treating diarrhea.

3. Your bladder and kidneys can be affected if you regularly eat salty foods such as seaweed, kelp, and salt. These types of food can soften hardness, and therefore can be used for symptomatic treatment related to muscle tension and stiffness.

4. Foods that have a pungent flavor tend to affect the large intestine and lungs. They include peppermint, parsley, ginger, coriander, clove, and chive and they all impact the large intestine and lungs. Pungent tasting foods can boost energy circulation and induce perspiration.

5. You small intestine and heart can be affected by bitter tasting foods such as radish, lettuce, and bitter melon. These foods can dry body fluids and increase body heat. This may explain why herbs utilized to treat diarrhea and fever always have a bitter taste because of their “drying” properties.

One should note that there are foods that possess more than one flavor, which is quite common (i.e., pork is both sweet and salty).

Foods, according to Chinese medicine, are also considered for their energies because they can produce cold or heat; this means they generate sensation of cold or heat to the human body. Drinking a glass of water, for example, will make your body feel cold but only for a short while, the sensations from foods, on the other hand, lasts significantly longer.

Regardless if they’re cold or hot, foods tend to produce a more enduring sensation on the body. They have five energies: neutral, cool, warm, cold, or hot. Interestingly, even when served in hot water, tea generates cold energy. Even if it is chilled, pepper gives out hot energy. While corn has neutral energy, chicken provides warm energy that is neither cold nor hot. Correspondingly, if you tend to suffer from acute and severe arthritis pain in cold winter days, then, to lessen the cold in your joints, you need to eat more foods that generate warm or hot energy.

Foods also have four movements: the downward movement that resolves asthma or vomiting, the upward movement that treats diarrhea, the inward movement that treats bowel movements, and the outward movement that relieves pain and induces perspiration.

The basis of Chinese medicine is harmony and balance. Nutritional therapy in Vancouver can contribute greatly to good health through its movements, energies, and flavors. This type of therapy has been used by the Chinese in curing imbalances within the body for thousands of years.

Written by Valerie

August 1st, 2017 at 7:57 am

Posted in Acupuncture